Insulating Your New Home: The Key to Energy Efficiency

Today, both businesses and consumers are realigning to become more sustainable and energy-efficient. Energy efficiency focuses on minimizing the power required to use certain products and services. Not only does energy efficiency reduce heating and cooling costs, but it also helps the environment by reducing emissions released by power plants.

The average household in the Midwest spends $3,000-3,500 per capita on heating. This translates to fossil fuels burnt and more emissions. If you want to save on energy bills and be environmentally conscious, the first step is to make your home energy efficient by installing insulation. The best time to do this? Right when you’re building your home.

Want to Build an Energy-Efficient Home? Start with Insulation

Insulation for Newly-Constructed Homes

While you’re planning and building your new home, you should follow the required R-value of insulation in Missouri as stated in the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). These are just the minimum requirements, though, and you should aim to exceed them if you’ve set out to make your build more energy efficient. Insulating your home adds to your home’s market value.

A properly insulated home is protected from the elements from top to bottom. It’s easier to ensure this right at the beginning of construction because your insulation options are much more varied compared to retrofitting your walls and attic after you finish building.

With that said, these are the key areas that need insulation installed in your new home for optimal energy efficiency, according to the U.S. Department of Energy:

  • Attic
  • Walls
  • Ceiling
  • Exterior doors and windows
  • The floors (especially above unheated spaces like the garage)
  • Ducts/crawlspace
  • Basement

In structures such as residential homes, there are areas called thermal envelopes. These are the areas listed above, where heat tends to escape. Typically, 15 percent of heat escapes through uninsulated basements and floors. Uninsulated attics, windows, and doors each let out 25 percent of heat, while uninsulated walls let out 35 percent.

With this much heat loss, you’re likely to spend more heating up your home, driving your energy use. By installing installation in these areas, you’re making sure that you optimize your energy efficiency.

Types of Insulation for New Homes

Once you’ve pinpointed the areas that need insulation, it’s time to decide what type of insulation material to install. You have a variety of options, but it’s best to consult your insulation experts to know which type fits specific parts of your home.

Batted Insulation

Batted insulation made from fiberglass materials is perfect for unfinished walls, floors, and ceilings. Batted fiberglass insulation has a broad range of R-values and has excellent acoustical performance.

Sprayed Foam Insulation

Ideal for unfinished attic floors or as an addition to existing finished or irregularly-shaped areas, closed cell spray foam insulation answers your extreme insulation requirements. Spray foam tightly seals all nooks and crannies that would otherwise cause heat loss.

Wet Spray Insulation

A popular and cost-effective alternative to spray foam, wet spray fiber insulation resists mold and has great air-sealing benefits, making it a great insulator for your walls and ceiling.

Blown-in Blanket Insulation

Like spray foam, this type of insulation can fill small, hard-to-reach areas, so it’s perfect for unfinished attic floors.

Insulate Your New Home Properly

Before finishing the construction of your Kansas City home, contact a reputable insulation company. Our team here at A+ Insulation uses the best and latest insulation techniques to give you a power-saving, energy-efficient home.

Contact us today for your insulation needs.